Emblem Types

 
 
 

Customer Cars


click to see more photos of this '37 Dodge

Mr. D. Upton's '37 Dodge. Enameled emblem restoration by Emblemagic.


click to see more photos of this '52 Studebaker

Mr. J. Irwin's '52 Studebaker. Plastic insert emblem reproduction by Emblemagic.

Hemmings Articles

Emblem Collecting Part I
Emblem Collecting Part II

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Emblem types handled by Emblemagic

"Emblems" is a general term which describes a vast array of assorted types and constructions. Our service and stock is limited mainly to the two types of emblems described below. However, we do stock other types of emblems.  If you already know what kind of emblem you need, click the button below for more helpful information.

Enameled Emblems    Plastic Emblems    Other Emblems

Enameled emblems

Picture of assorted enamel car emblems This type of emblem, sometimes called cloisonné, has a metal base of copper, which is usually plated with chrome, nickel, or gold and is inlaid with enamel colors. By enamel, we mean the hard fired porcelain or glass (it is really a true glass and not porcelain). This kind of emblem was used on almost all cars until the 1940's. They continued to be used on some American cars, although very rarely. Foreign sports cars continue to use them routinely. They can be found on the radiator grille, headlight bars, hubcaps, trunk racks, spares, side mounts, and in the interior as well. They also appear in key fobs and many types of jewelry. Click on the picture here for a larger view of these various original cloisonné emblems. car emblem with enamel chipping out

Enamel emblems that are deteriorating may have plating that has faded or is pitted, or the inlaid colors sometimes begin cracking and chipping out like little bits of glass or plastic. As we said, enamel is actually colored glass, which is fired in a high temperature kiln, thus bonding the melted glass directly to the copper substrate of the emblem.

Plastic insert emblems

This type of emblem is made from a clear plastic which appears to have 1962 plymouth plastic car emblem rear its design 1962 plymouth plastic car emblem front and colors imbedded inside. The underside of this emblem is an embossed surface which is usually coated a solid color. This type of emblem first appeared in the late 40's and continues to be used on cars today.  However, beginning in the 1980's new processes of lamination, doming, and what not are beginning to signal the end of this type of emblem, as cheaper mass production technologies become available. The emblem we are describing is usually mounted in some type of metal bezel which is chrome or gold plated. They are found on the car's hood, trunk, quarter panels, hubcaps, steering wheel, and almost anywhere else for decorative effect. Deterioration in this type of emblem is usually due to the flaking off of paint on the underside of the emblem, or sometimes colors fade away. The clear plastic may also develop crazing or hairline cracking.

 

 
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